david schrott is everywhere

Callie’s first train ride

Posted in philadelphia by thebreakfastdictator on 07/14/2017

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We took the train to Philly back in May. Trains will forever and always be better than cars. I love Kodak Tri-X.

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McDonald’s Sign, Gone

Posted in B&W Photography, Uncategorized by thebreakfastdictator on 05/23/2016

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When I was first getting interested in photography, my Dad told me that there was this sign on Columbia Avenue at a McDonald’s. It was one of the old school arches. He said I should take a photo of it before it gets taken down (this was the late 90s). I never did until just a few days before it was taken down (around April 5th this year). I’m glad I did. I’ll miss this sign.

Fiddle Creek Dairy Farm

Posted in B&W Photography, Lancaster by thebreakfastdictator on 06/18/2014
Tim & Frances

Tim & Frances

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Tim Sauder

Light leaks, dust, and Je’m.

Posted in family, Lancaster by thebreakfastdictator on 04/03/2014

 

Je'm + Lucky

Je’m + Lucky

In my advanced photo class we learned how to let go a little bit; to be okay with light-leaks, film scratches, soft focus, bleached prints. I had a really hard time with some of that. I enjoyed messing up the print since the prints were easily reproducible. But I detested the idea of ruining the negative and sometimes I’d shoot an entire roll (12 images) of pretty much the exact same thing. Just in case. I barely do that anymore, but I still dust things obsessively and fear shooting all of my expired film because “what if I get a really good shot and ________?!”

I guess the world would end if that happened, wouldn’t it?

The film came back from the lab today and this photo was my favorite. It has a giant light leak across it (no idea how that happened). And when you shoot film, you can’t undo the light-leak like Afterlight or Snapseed tells you that you can.

And that’s okay.

Lighten up, David.

Winter 2014

Posted in Lancaster by thebreakfastdictator on 02/11/2014
January 2014

January 2014

This winter reminds me oh-so-much of the winter of my Junior year of college (2003). During my Junior project classes, the temperatures barely got above 20 and there was perpetual snow on the ground. This made it rather difficult to proceed with my figures in landscapes style of work that I was doing at the time. We tried once – on an 8 degree day. I don’t think we even made it through a roll of film that day.  A friend of mine hooked me up with a few indoor locations in downtown Lancaster and we got to shoot in the relatively warm (and snowless) interiors that was quite magnificent.

The above photo was shot at dusk a few Saturdays ago after a light snowstorm breezed through Central Pennsylvania. This scene was no where as light as the image makes it look. It was basically dark out. And yet it seems to capture this winter in its essence – blue, frigid, snowy.

There are plants in the potters in the basement. Spring is close. And it can’t come soon enough.

Thistle Finch Distillery (2)

Posted in Lancaster by thebreakfastdictator on 01/29/2014
Thistle Finch. Batch Four.

Thistle Finch. Batch Four.

Night Songs

Posted in B&W Photography, Lancaster, Personal Work by thebreakfastdictator on 01/04/2014

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Rooster Street Finals

Posted in B&W Photography, Farm Life, Lancaster by thebreakfastdictator on 12/26/2013

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november songs are sung quietly

Posted in B&W Photography, Lancaster, Personal Work by thebreakfastdictator on 11/10/2013
november songs are sung quietly

november songs are sung quietly

This photo is now ten years old, and I still consider it my best. My Senior Thesis was a remarkably difficult effort. For the two years prior, I had been making endless amounts of black and white photos (sometimes shooting 20-25 rolls of film in a weekend) with a moderate to high amount of “success”. I’m honestly still not sure what “success” may mean as a 23 year old photo major (getting A’s and the praise of your professors, I guess; which did nothing but feed the ego that was about to be deflated by the long, tragic, nine-month war that was my thesis).

During the summer before my Senior year, I worked hard at creating a style that was my own, and by the Fall term, I was flailing – mostly at my own hot air. I tried color, b&w, still life, portrait, tableaux. Nothing was working. At some point, I realized that there was a poultry store in the Italian Market that sold doves. I purchased a few for eight dollars each and began experimenting with those. Annnnnnd everything was awful.

One November weekend, my roommate and I drove out to Lancaster and made some photos in, what was then, the Lancaster Futon Building, which was mostly empty and owned by Andrew Martin and some of his business partners. The third floor was essentially my studio for four to five cold months while I ground out photo after horrible photo.

…Except for that one night Lee and I were on the third floor. We named the bird Burt Reynolds and as I was packing my gear after a really boring and deflating shoot, Burt was sitting in his cage with the Fulton Opera house illuminating the background. I opened my camera lens to 2.8, set the shutter at one second and spun out one final roll, hoping something, just something would be worthwhile on it.

A few days later, I processed and contact printed the film. And there it was. The most beautiful image I have ever made. My jaw dropped and I immediately made a bunch of prints (currently, they sit in a box on my dashboard). For one bright moment amidst the nine dark months of my thesis, I sat content. Replicating success, especially accidental success, is quite often very difficult. This photo is my benchmark for excellence (at least in my own repertoire) and each and every time I pick up the camera, I strive, strain and yearn for one more happy accident.

David Dietz. York, Pennsylvania

Posted in Farm Life, Fine Living Lancaster by thebreakfastdictator on 08/30/2013
David Dietz. Peasant at Large.

David Dietz. Peasant at Large.